21.02.20 Once again the papers deliberately get it wrong about stoves

Posted on February 21, 2020
Archive : February 2020
Category : Wood Burning Stoves

Once again the papers deliberately get it wrong about stoves

If you've seen the papers today, let's look at the facts about the Government banning stoves. Here's a direct quote from the Defra news release, specifically about stoves.

"Government recognises that a range of households have open fires or stoves and is not seeking to prevent their use or installation through these proposals."


Over the years The Stove Industry Alliance (SIA), of which the Stove Yard is a founding member, has been working closely with Defra and to reiterate: they are not going to ban stoves. As an industry employing thousands of people and in direct contact with the Government, we'd be the first to know. If you're an existing stove owner or are thinking about buying a stove we urge you to read the short Defra news release so that you're armed with the facts and not some lazy journalist's misleading headline.

Here's Defra's news release in full...

 

*** EMBARGOED TO 00:01, FRIDAY 21 FEBRUARY ***

 

Good afternoon

 

You are receiving this email because the government response to the Consultation on Cleaner Domestic Burning of Solid Fuels and Wood is due to be published tomorrow. I will forward a link to the published documents in the morning.

 

Background:

 

In January 2019 Defra published its Clean Air Strategy. This set out the actions which Government will take to reduce emissions from a range of sources, including domestic burning.

 

Evidence shows that the burning of wood and coal in the home is the largest single contributor to particulate matter pollution - identified by the World Health Organization as the most damaging air pollutant.

 

Following the publication of the Clean Air Strategy, Defra consulted on proposals to introduce legislation for cleaner domestic burning of solid fuels in Autumn 2018.

 

The proposals included:

  • Restrictions on the sale of wet wood for domestic burning, so that it can only be purchased in volumes over a specified cut-off point
  • Applying a 2% sulphur limit and smoke emission limit of 5g per hour to all manufactured solid fuels 
  • Phasing out the sale of bituminous (traditional house) coal

Government recognises that a range of households have open fires or stoves and is not seeking to prevent their use or installation through these proposals. However, action is needed to reduce the amount of PM2.5 produced as a direct result of domestic combustion.

 

To encourage change, our objective is to raise awareness of the potential health impacts of air pollution from domestic burning, ensure consumers are provided with reliable information to make informed choices, and legislate to restrict sales of the most polluting fuels.

RECENT POSTS
CATEGORIES
ARCHIVES