Stove Emergencies

If smoke is entering the room

Take the following urgent action:
• Open doors and windows
• Allow the stove to burn itself out
• Do not stay in the room any longer than is necessary
• Do not attempt to re-light the stove until the stove baffle plate and flue system have been checked and cleared of blockages
• Get your chimney swept as soon as possible

For more detailed information on smoke entering the room please click here

If you smell or suspect fumes

Carbon monoxide  (CO) is odourless and tasteless and the gas can also be disguised amongst other combustion smells.

If you suspect carbon monoxide is present then take the following urgent action:
• Open doors and windows
• Allow the stove to burn itself out
• Do not stay in the room any longer than is necessary
• Do not attempt to re-light the stove until the stove baffle plate and flue system have been checked and cleared of blockages
• Get your chimney swept as soon as possible

For more detailed information on smoke and fumes entering the room please click here

If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds

Take the following urgent action:
• Open doors and windows
• Allow the stove to burn itself out
• Do not stay in the room any longer than is necessary
• Do not attempt to re-light the stove until the stove baffle plate and flue system have been checked and cleared of blockages
• Get your chimney swept as soon as possible

Virtually all cases of Carbon Monoxide poisoning with solid fuel are due to poor installation or lack of stove maintenance. Also check that other appliance operating elsewhere in the house are not causing the CO to build up (eg gas fire or gas or oil boiler system). If you haven't got a CO alarm, then please get one today – they really are life-savers.

For more detailed information on Carbon Monoxide please click here

If the stove starts burning slowly or if it goes out frequently

A sufficient flow of combustion air to enable the stove to burn effectively and safely is vital. When a stove is starved of this it will be hard to light, have lack-lustre dirty orange flames and may frequently go out. With double glazing, laminated floors and improved insulation modern homes are effectively becoming 'airtight' so that the home's natural ventilation is reduced to the point where it can cause a stove to burn poorly.

• Open a window in the room to see if this improves how the fire burns
• If this improves the situation then you need to check that any existing air vent, especially if it was installed at the same time as the stove, is not blocked, either on the inside or the outside of the house

If you don't have an air vent, then you should seek the advice of Hetas registered or other approved stove installer, to ensure that your installation complies with Building Regulations air supply requirements